Contents:

End of Game

Best of Three

Going to Time

Tournament

KEYFORGE END OF GAME PROCEDURE

End of Game

Each Swiss tournament round and some single elimination rounds consist of one game—the winner of the game is the winner of the round. Some single elimination rounds are made up of two or three games—the first person to win two games is the winner of the round. A game ends in one of the following ways:

 

Three Keys Forged: One player managed to forge three Keys before the other player.

Time: When time is called at the end of a tournament round, if neither player has three Keys forged, they follow the “Going to Time” rules below to determine a win.

Concession: A player voluntarily concedes defeat at any point during the game. The conceding player receives a loss and the opponent receives a win.

 

Best-of-Three End of Game

When a game ends in a best-of-three match during single elimination rounds, unless one player has won two games in the match, the players begin setup for a new game (see “Game Setup” on page 5). The player who lost the previous game chooses which player will act as “first player.”

 

If time is called at the end of the best-of-three match and players have the same number of wins (zero or one), then they follow the Going to Time rules below. Otherwise, whichever player won the first game of that match receives the win for the whole match and his or her opponent receives a loss.

 

Going to Time

When time is called for the round, the player who is currently taking their turn finishes their turn. If that player does not achieve victory by the end of their turn, then their opponent may take one last turn. If neither player has achieved victory (forged three Keys) at the end of the opponent’s last turn, they must follow the steps below, in order, to determine who receives a win for the current game. That player’s opponent receives a loss for the game. If a single elimination round with a best-of-three match ends and only one player has a game win for the match, the player with a game win wins the match instead of players following the steps below.

 

Note: These steps take place in a post-game tiebreaker phase. While following these steps, neither player is considered to be currently taking their turn.  

 

1. Each player who has 6 or more Æmber forges 1 Key (removing the 6 Æmber from their pool as usual). Cards that affect Æmber costs have no effect during this step. Each player can only forge 1 key from this step.

2. The player with the most Keys forged is the winner. If there is a tie, proceed to step 3.

3. The player with the most remaining Æmber in their pool is the winner. If there is still a tie, proceed to step 4.

4. Each player selects one of their houses. Then, each player totals the number of friendly creatures in play of that house and adds the amount of bonus Æmber from that house’s cards still in their hand. This is that player’s “potential Æmber.” The player with the most potential Æmber is the winner. If there is still a tie, proceed to step 5.

 

5. The first player is the winner.

 

End of Game Example:

Time is called for the round. After finishing their last turns, neither Eric nor Travis has three forged Keys. They follow the rules for going to time. Eric has one Key forged and nine Æmber; Travis has two Keys forged and three Æmber. Based on step 1, Eric immediately forges a Key and removes 6 Æmber from his pool. Now both Eric and Travis have two forged Keys and three Æmber remaining in their pool. Because of this, they proceed to step 4. Eric chooses Brobnar while Travis chooses Mars. Eric has four Brobnar creatures in play and four Brobnar cards in hand that give an Æmber bonus, putting his potential Æmber total at 8. Travis has six Mars creatures in play and one Mars card in hand that gives an Æmber bonus, putting his potential Æmber total at 7. Eric has the higher potential Æmber total, so he receives a win and Travis receives a loss.

 

Tournament Points

Players earn tournament points at the end of each round. At the end of a tournament, the player with the most tournament points wins the tournament. In the case of a larger event, they are instead used to determine who makes the cut to elimination rounds. Players earn tournament points as follows:

Win = 1 tournament point 

Loss = 0 tournament points

Tiebreakers

If two or more players have the same number of tournament points, tiebreakers are used to determine each player’s standing within that group. Tiebreakers are used in the following order until all players within that group have been given a standing.

 

Strength of Schedule: A player’s strength of schedule is calculated by dividing each opponent’s total tournament points by the number of rounds that opponent has played, adding the results of each opponent played, and then dividing that total by the number of opponents the player has played. The player with the highest strength of schedule is ranked above all other players in the group not yet ranked. The player with the second-highest strength of schedule is ranked second among all players in the group not yet ranked, and so on.

Extended Strength of Schedule: A player’s extended strength of schedule is calculated by adding each opponent’s strength of schedule and then dividing by the number of opponents that player has played. The player with the highest extended strength of schedule is ranked above all other players in the group not yet ranked. The player with the second-highest extended strength of schedule is ranked second among all players in the group not yet ranked, and so on.

Random: If any players are still tied after all other tiebreakers have been applied, then those players are ranked in a random order below any players already ranked in the group.

 
 
 
 

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